Monday, October 19, 2015

Newark, Southwell, and Kelham Hall

A day out in Nottinghamshire with one of my support workers visiting two of my favourite towns, Newark and Southwell.

Newark has its castle, several Victorian arcades, pretty courtyards and alleyways, and a beautiful market place.













We ate our sandwiches in the castle grounds and then walked down to the Market Place and the shops. As usual we looked in all the charity shops; Sue Ryder seemed to be having some sort of sale - as many items as you could get in a large carrier bag for £9. I found nine items in my size; there was room for more, but nothing else would fit me. I came home with a suit, a Regatta fleece, A Slazenger top, two smart shirts, two sports shirts, and a pair of trousers....the best day's shopping I've ever done.

Southwell is rightly famous for its minster, but there are other reasons to visit the town, quirky independent shops, a workhouse that's open as a museum...and everything you might want to know about Bramley apples. Southwell is the home of Bramley apples and this week is the town's apple festival. There were apples in almost every shop window, irrespective of what was sold there...quite a bit of thought and care had been taken with incorporating the fruit into the regular window displays. Excellent!



  
On the way home we called in at Kelham Hall and Country Park, and weren't we glad we did. It's a lovely spot. The hall itself seems to be used by a number of separate businesses but there is limited access to the public. However, being a bit nosey as we are, myself and Siobhan went everywhere that we could reach on the ground floor; everyone said 'hello' to us and seemed to usher us in to every room - maybe they thought we were some sort of government inspectors. To be honest, it's a natural skill I have...and it's happened before. We were disappointed with the cafe's facilities...and so we told the chef on our way out.






We went for a short walk in the park and were joined by dozens of grey squirrels; they were everywhere.